nyatu’ maanǔn mungut bigabu



nyatu’ maanǔn mungut bigabu (2021) first exhibited at A Sunken Garden (2021), a collaborative project with artist Lyndon Blue at Girls School Gallery in Boorloo (Perth), WA in October 2021. nyatu’ maanǔn mungut bigabu (2021) then won the 2022 National Photography Prize and exhibited at Murray Art Museum Albury, NSW.

These four photographic prints use images taken on Bidayǔh native lands in Sarawak, in rivers where Baker’s mother played as a child and on ancestral farm lands.

These images are autostereograms, also known as Magic Eye images, a nostalgic optical illusion technology that was very popular in the 1990s during the artist’s childhood. Embedded in these images are forgotten or rarely used Bidayǔh words that are about wandering, collecting and foraging.
Serian Bidayǔh language has hundreds of terms for activities that speak to a daily rhythm of moving through the jungle and working intimately with plant life. In current semi-Industrialised Bidayǔh society, these words are almost never used and have been left behind. These images are incantations to evoke the old knowledge these words hold. They suggest that if we learn to see the natural world in a slightly different way, we can access another way of knowing and moving.



Artwork details:

Tiyan Baker, nyatu’ mungut maanǔn bigabu, 2021, digital autostereogram print on cotton rag



nyatu’ (to collect fallen fruit), 2021, installation view, Murray Art Museum Albury, NSW. Photo by Jeremy Weihrauch.




bigabu (to walk through water), 2021, installation view, Murray Art Museum Albury, NSW. Photo by Jeremy Weihrauch.




mungut (to pick only the young buds), 2021, installation view, Murray Art Museum Albury, NSW. Photo by Jeremy Weihrauch.





maanǔn (found all over the place in plenty), 2021, installation view, Murray Art Museum Albury, NSW. Photo by Jeremy Weihrauch.




nyatu’ maanǔn mungut bigabu, 2021, installation view, Murray Art Museum Albury, NSW. Photo by Jeremy Weihrauch.




nyatu’ maanǔn mungut bigabu, 2021, installation view, Murray Art Museum Albury, NSW. Photo by Jeremy Weihrauch.













I live and work on the lands of the Gadigal and Wangal people of the Eora nation.
This sovereign land was never ceded.
The land I live on always was and always will be Aboriginal land.